13-Story Building Could Bring 100+ Units to Journal Square

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345 Baldwin Ave Jersey City Development Proposal
345 Baldwin Ave, Jersey City. Photo by Google Street View.

While many of the new high-rises in Jersey City’s Journal Square neighborhood are being proposed for properties located within a stone’s throw away from the PATH station, a new plan by a developer could bring a 13-story mixed-use project to a property located near the Divided Highway roughly half a mile from the transportation hub.

An anonymous firm called 345 Baldwin, LLC is behind the major proposal for the tract at 345 Baldwin Avenue, which is located between Washburn Street and the Bergen Arches. The company has applied for Preliminary and Final Site Plan approval from the Jersey City Planning Board in connection with its plan to construct 116 residential units, 1,945 square feet of retail space on the ground floor, and a 21-space parking garage, according to a legal notice from November 2. It is not immediately clear how the units would be priced.

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Deviations such height in stories are being sought in connection with the application, but the legal notice states that this proposal in the Journal Square 2060 Redevelopment Plan Area calls for the building to be of a height that is permitted.

The Planning Board is scheduled to hear the application during its next meeting on Tuesday, November 13 at 5:30pm. This comes seven months after the board was initially supposed to hear a proposal from the LLC that called for a 14-story building with 97 apartments and two floors of office space, according to a March legal notice. The website for Lower Manhattan-based Titanium Realty Group features renderings that appear to be associated with the previous proposal. Titanium is also involved in local projects such as 75-81 Jordan Street and 61-65 Newkirk Street.

The LLC acquired the property on Baldwin Avenue last year for $3.5 million, according to NJ Parcels. The site used to contain a Delta gas station and a business called Baldwin Auto Repair, though the gas station part of the premises was removed within the past year. It sits just across the street from a property that also used to contain a Delta gas station, but it set to be replaced with a six-story 45-unit development.

101 Storms Ave Jersey City Development Proposal
101 Storms Ave, Jersey City. Photo by Google Street View.

Meanwhile, roughly a mile away, a much smaller development could be constructed in Jersey City’s McGinley Square neighborhood. A separate legal notice that was issued on November 3 states that a four-story mixed-use building is being proposed for 101 Storms Avenue near the corner of Monticello Avenue. The “as of right” proposal by Storms Avenue, LLC calls for the structure to include ten residential units and a retail component on the ground floor. The developer’s application for Preliminary and Final Major Site Plan approval has also been scheduled for the Jersey City Planning Board’s November 13 meeting.

Note to readers: The dates that applications are scheduled to be heard by the Jersey City Planning Board and other commissions are subject to change.

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12 COMMENTS

    • you seem to love every development no matter how big or small….just build, build, build!!

      We’ll deal with all the consequences later but just BUILD BUILD BUILD!

      • With eyesores like this, and crackheads vs. A brand new development that would contribute to the neighborhood in a positive manner for people from, our city, either downtown or anywhere else, NYC, other parts of NJ,… Yeah, very much pro! And consequences? So many empty lots, so much growth potential for our city to build. Added jobs for our residents, added tax revenue for our city, money used in our restaurants, stores, etc. My vision for JC is such where tourists don’t just come here because we are close to NYC and cheaper airbnb but because we are also one of the best, if not the best city in the world. We have everything here! It’s time we beautify our city, expand and add to our potential and be proud of where we live!

        • I agree development done responsibly is great for the neighborhood, but key word responsibly. Many of the developers in our area though are more concerned about squeezing every penny out of every deal than the long term impact to the neighborhood. Hence why they always want variances with higher buildings with limited parking…no traffic studies to see how it impacts the already congested roads in the neighborhood. You have 114 units with 21 parking spots…and this isn’t exactly downtown where you are a skip away from everything. Most people in this area use or need cars…until the city comes up with a better transportation solution so less cars are needed (and no not city bike stations on roads with potholes and crazy drivers with no designated bike lanes).

          Developers love coming into these areas since people are hungry for change. So as you said…wait you want to build a building on that empty lot…BUILD! Whatever you want!! Until in 10 yrs you’re stuck in gridlock traffic trying to get to 139 or the Heights…just go for a drive in downtown midday and see how pleasant that is. Downtown at some point was desolate with empty lots and crackheads. Now it’s a logistical nightmare and those developers are long gone!

          • Actually I drive through downtown everyday. It’s beautiful. I would look forward to more development coming on Marin Blvd and etc. I do think that Marin should be a one way 4 lane street. Would definitely ease traffic and make things better. Honestly I think your complaints and points are minuscule. People that are moving in are using Mass transportation and are very happy with it. The Path is by far better than the MTA, even at the worst times. And by the way, people always find ways to complain about everything. About rent being too high, well the more built, the more competition, the better prices will be. About the change in the neighborhood and that it will change, yet these same people would complain they live in rough areas. And then there are people like yourself that know all the ins and outs of development. Sal, they developers who are building care about profit, there is nothing wrong with that, and now look how amazing downtown is. People keep complaining and saying we are a tale of two cities, let’s make ward F, Ward C, ward B, Ward A better than downtown! Let’s make change. Let’s welcome a better life for our city. Let’s welcome development all throughout our city, I rather have issues with parking, then a bullet…

        • you sound like you have rose tinted glasses and unrealistic expectations of this utopia, while putting down people that live here and have lived here for a long time. you sound like a more recent transplant.
          yes, there IS something wrong about developers and those associated with it only caring about profit.
          driving through downtown used to be enjoyable, now it’s a headache which is spreading to other parts of jc. downtown has lost it’s soul. it’s sterile, boring, very bland and mostly white. sounds like you want that for all of JC.
          .

          • You are right, no one wanted to drive through downtown 20 years ago. Just like no one wanted to drive down or walk at the hill. And now because of these “evil” developers, it all of the sudden matters… I live in JC, I love jc! It hurts me hearing people saying Jersey-City is a tale of two cities, being envious that all good restaurants and etc open in downtown vs. Greenville or bergen/ Lafayette. But when a building is proposed they argue that they don’t need it or want it. It makes no sense. People complain about everything. It’s either, “we are the forgotten people and area, or, oh no they have interest in our neighborhood, it means the empty lot where someone was shot at few hours ago matters, will have a home with higher prices, damn that’s not good for the neighborhood. Honestly I go to neighborhood meetings all the time. People make no sense. It doesn’t matter their race or ethnicity, everyone says nonsense that makes no sense. I on the other hand fight for Jersey-City, all of it. Because it’s my home and it matters! I welcome development and money into Jersey-City, because it matters!

  1. I used to use those gas stations and often thought about how ugly they were. Gas stations and other car oriented building types are not good for creating a safe pedestrian environment. You want people to be able to walk to the PATH station. It should be encouraged with thoughtful urban design. Sure, the PATH trains are crowded, and something will have to be done about that eventually, but this kind of development is solving part of the puzzle. We need housing in walking distance of transit to reduce car usage and the associated congestion.

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