New Details Revealed for 131-Unit Development on New York Avenue

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39 New York Ave Jersey City Heights Studioschafer
39 New York Avenue, Jersey City Heights. Rendering via StudioSCHAFER.

Jersey Digs has exclusively received updated information about an upcoming residential project at the edge of The Heights neighborhood in Jersey City.

Construction is set to begin this summer on the five-story all-residential development in Ward C at 39 New York Avenue, a hillside property along the Palisades between Hoboken’s western border and the Palisade Avenue overpass. The 1.288-acre tract was previously vacant and periodically used by Galaxy Recycling to park dumpsters and trucks.


This project is being developed by The NRP Group of Ohio in partnership with the Hoboken Brownstone Company of Jersey City.


The NRP Group’s Vice President of Development for the New York Metropolitan Area, Jonathan Gertman, told Jersey Digs in an interview last month that the real estate developer is “one of the largest multifamily development construction and management companies in the country,” but that this is their first project in the Garden State. He cited this corridor’s “developing neighborhood feel” as a reason why the group chose to get involved in this project.

The development has been in the works for several years and the number of proposed units has been fluctuating since it was first proposed. Originally, the building was set to include 155 rental units, but that number later dropped to 132 units. Now, according to Gertman, the development will include 131 market-rate units when completed, including 28 studios, 57 one-bedrooms, and 46 two-bedrooms. Many of the apartments will include views of the rest of Jersey City to the south and Lower Manhattan to the east.

None of the units will be designated as affordable, but Gertman stated that The NRP Group could possibly develop affordable housing in Jersey City at some point. In lieu of providing affordable units, as part of the company’s five-year municipal tax exemption, it will give over $200,000 to the Jersey City Affordable Housing Trust Fund in three stages.

There is no public transportation access from the site itself, though the 2nd Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Station is roughly a half-mile walk away. Plus, parking will be included in the building in an underground garage, though the number of units had previously been unclear. However, Gertman said that the facility is now expected to include 82 spaces when completed, in addition to a shuttle bus service for residents that would operate down the hill to the Hoboken Terminal.

In addition, new renderings for the project designed by StudioSCHAFER have been released, showing that the development will include a ground floor leasing office and a second floor outdoor “amenity deck.”

39 New York Ave Jersey City Heights Courtyard Studioschafer
Outdoor deck. Rendering via StudioSCHAFER.

The development is expected to be completed in the spring of 2020.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. 131 units on an already congested narrow road will add to the daily gridlock on the Jersey City border. Where are the infrastructure improvements to support this development ?

  2. What ‘developing neighborhood feel’ is this guy talking about? If anything, that parcel feels isolated. In one direction, it’s a very steep yet short walk up to the Heights and across the street is a sometimes loud and smelly recycling center. You have to cross the light rail tracks and you’re in Hoboken, immediately met by an office building on one side an a bus dept on the other. Yes, there’s a park a block away and the city is aiming to buy out the bust depot to expand the park in what is probably the most congested area of Hoboken. Until Coles Ave is extended to Paterson Ave (parallel to the light trail tracks), there are issues here, just not ones that JC seems to want to deal with since it probably impacts Hoboken even more.

  3. $200,000 to the city is nothing for a project of that size. Take the tax abatement away. Developers want to build in Jersey City. No incentive is needed.

  4. Road is already always gridlocked and gets backed up all the way into the heights. It has taken me a 45 minutes to get down this road at rush hour. Is there any plan at place to help with the traffic?

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